Research

Previously funded studies appear chronologically, with the most recent appearing first.

  • Assessing Therapeutic Targets for Adrenocortical Tumors

    This study is looking at new therapeutic targets for medical treatment of cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors, which cause Cushing’s disease, one of the most common canine endocrine disorders. Co-sponsored with the Morris Animal Foundation, Grant Number: D09CA-913 RESEARCHERS Dr. Miriam J. Kool, DVM University of Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • Pharmakokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Hydroxyzine in Healthy Dogs

    Atopic dermatitis is a common allergic skin disease in dogs and humans. Antihistamines are among the most commonly prescribed treatments. Unfortunately, the optimal dosages of commonly used antihistamines have never been scientifically determined, and their effects have not been validated in dogs. Researchers at North Carolina State University wanted to determine whether hydroxyzine, one of […]
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  • MicroRNA Profiling and MicroRNA-Based Treatment of Canine Cancers

    The goals of this study are to identify important canine miRNAs that can be used to improve cancer diagnosis and treatment in the dog. Results MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-protein coding RNAs that have been implicated in humans as having a fundamental role in cancer initiation and progression. Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common bone […]
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  • Pooled Association Mapping for Canine Hereditary Disorders

    To develop a system that will map genetic traits causing health problems. More than 450 canine genetic traits are listed on the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals list. These traits affect all body systems in dogs and can cause health problems ranging from mild disease susceptibility to severe illness and death. Researchers will use a […]
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  • MicroRNA Expression Profiling of Canine Osteosarcoma

    By studying miRNA expression in osteosarcoma, the investigators hope to identify new molecular targets for therapy that will lead to better treatment of this disease. Osteosarcoma, commonly known as bone cancer, is a significant cause of death in large- and giant-breed dogs. Because cancer is believed to be fundamentally a genetic disease, genomic approaches are […]
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  • Reciprocal Relationship of PTEN and p21 in Canine Cancer

    An estimated one out of every two dogs alive today will get cancer in its lifetime, and as many as 50 percent of those will die from the disease. Despite significant gains in cancer treatment, a thorough understanding of why cancers arise and why they behave as they do is essential to improving prevention and […]
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  • Enhance Detection, Diagnosis and Treatment of Canine Lymphoma

    A Collaborative Study by Veterinary Oncologists, Pathologists, and Diagnostic Laboratories to Enhance Detection, Diagnosis and Treatment of Canine Lymphoma To enhance detection, diagnosis and treatment of lymphoma. Therefore altering cost of treatment according to the type of tumor (as in humans) and increase survival rate. Results Canine lymphoma is the neoplasm most often treated by […]
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  • Juvenile Cardiomyopathy

    Our ultimate goal is to develop a mutation-based test for JDCM. There are several difficulties with JDCM, especially compared with other genetic diseases that affect your breed. Because the diagnosis of affected animals is often made after it is no longer possible to obtain blood or tissue, the most useful DNA samples cannot be obtained […]
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  • Comparison of 2 ACTH Stimulation Tests in Determining Adrenal Function in Critically Ill Dogs

    Use of low-dose ACTH stimulation testing may be important in diagnosing mild degrees of adrenocortical insufficiency and a new syndrome, critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (formerly known as relative adrenal insufficiency), which has been recognized in critically ill human and veterinary patients. Both 0.5 and 5 μg/kg doses of cosyntropin cause maximal adrenal stimulation with regard […]
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  • Mapping Genes Associated with Canine Hemangiosarcoma

    Hemangiosarcoma (HSA), a malignant tumor of vascular endothelial cells, is a significant health concern in dogs, with an incidence of ~2% of all tumors. A national health survey of Golden Retriever reported that neoplasia accounted for >60% of all reported deaths and HAS was the most common malignant tumor affecting >15% of Golden Retrievers. A […]
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