Research

Previously funded studies appear chronologically, with the most recent appearing first.

  • Identifying Genes Regulating Addison’s Disease in the Portuguese Water Dog

    Addison’s disease, or primary adrenocortical insufficiency, is characterized by destruction of the adrenal cortex, resulting in the inability to produce cortisone when stimulated with the hormone ACTH. In Portuguese Water Dogs (PWDs), this disease occurs with a frequency of 1-2 percent, and is a heritable autoimmune disease of low penetrance, caused by several interacting genes. […]
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  • Mapping Refinement of Quantitative Trait Loci for Canine Hip Dysplasia

    Hip dysplasia is one of the most common inherited traits in dogs with an extremely high incidence in some large breeds. It is caused by mutations in multiple genes. In previous studies, investigators discovered the genetic markers that point to the chromosomal regions that harbor the genes that contribute to hip dysplasia. In this study, […]
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  • Mechanism of Epithelial Injury in Canine Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) occurs relatively frequently in dogs and can cause vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia and weight loss. Despite the incidence and severity of IBD in dogs, the underlying causes remain uncertain. Current theory suggests an interplay of genetic, environmental and immunological factors. Investigators will obtain epithelial cells from gastrointestinal tract tissue during routine gastrointestinal […]
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  • Canine Lymphoma

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that have been implicated in humans as having a fundamental role in cancer initiation and progression. Canine diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents one of the most frequently encountered canine neoplasms. We hypothesized that canine DLBCL possess a unique miRNA expression signature and that miRNA dysregulation contributes to […]
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  • Canine Hemangiosarcoma

    The main goal of this project was to develop a diagnostic test that can be used to detect hemangiosarcoma cells in blood samples from dogs. The rationale for the test is based on the fact that, as a tumor of cells that line blood vessels, hemangiosarcoma tumor cells are in intimate contact with blood and […]
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  • Gene Expression Profiling of Relapsed Lymphoma in Dogs

    Lymphoma is one of the most common cancers in dogs. Breeds with a high incidence include Boxers, Golden Retrievers, and German Shepherds. It is also one of the most treatable cancers – more than 90 percent of dogs treated with chemotherapy go into remission. Unfortunately, most dogs relapse and eventually die from the disease. Results […]
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  • Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activity in Canine Hemangiosarcoma

    Hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is a common and fatal canine cancer, for which there are no effective treatments. HSA is caused by malignant blood vessel cells that spread. Despite surgery and chemotherapy, the median survival time for dogs diagnosed with HSA is little more than six months. It is more commonly seen in male dogs between eight […]
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  • Recombinant Thyrotropin (TSH)

    Standard for the Next Generation of Canine TSH Immunoassays With Improved Sensitivity Overall, this research project completed the genetic phase of the project and are reproducibly producing reasonable quantities of recombinant canine TSH in vitro and purifying it with high recovery to high purity. In the future, this standard can serve as a reproducible standard […]
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  • Establishing a Genetic Linkage Between Addison’s Disease and DNA Markers

    Statistical evaluation of the dogs’ pedigrees suggests a single locus of large Addison’s disease is a late onset disorder caused by deterioration of the adrenal gland cortex. Although Addison’s disease occurs in the general canine population, some breeds show a greater prevalence as noted by owners and breeders: Bearded Collies, Standard Poodles, Leonbergers, Portuguese Water […]
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  • prcd Progressive Retinal Atrophy

    Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) is an inherited eye disease that cause blindness in dogs. In Portuguese Water Dogs, it is a form of PRA called prcd or progressive rod-cone degeneration and is inherited through an autosomal recessive gene. Because the disease can be passed on only if both dogs carry the gene, a test that […]
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