Addison’s Disease and Symmetrical Lupoid Onychodystrophy in Bearded Collies Provide Common Ground for Identifying Susceptibility Loci Underlying Canine Autoimmune Disorders

Hypoadrenocorticism or Addison’s disease (AD) is a life-threatening condition that afflicts multiple dog breeds and results from autoimmune destruction of the adrenal glands. Similarly, another canine autoimmune condition that causes pain and suffering is Symmetrical Lupoid Onychodystrophy (SLO). Both AD and SLO are postulated to be complexly inherited and preliminary data suggest a common set of susceptibility genes working in concert with additional genes that determine expression of either disease. For the study of AD and SLO the investigators will focus on the Bearded Collie breed due to its relatively high prevalence of both conditions and a genomic structure favorable for identifying variations in the DNA. The investigators will scan the entire canine genome using genetic markers coupled with whole genome sequencing to identify chromosomal regions that harbor genetic changes contributing to disease manifestation. The disease risk conferred by each of these genetic variants, or quantitative trait loci (QTL), will then be calculated to develop a tool for selecting sires and dams early in life, thereby allowing breeders to choose mating pairs that will produce offspring with a low likelihood of developing AD and SLO.

Co-sponsored with the AKC Canine Health Foundation, Grant Number: 02488

Anita Oberbauer, PhD; University of California, Davis
Amount: $15,000