Research Update CHF 02322 EY-4: Analysis of the Health, Behavioral, and Longevity Data Collected in the 9/11 Medical Surveillance Longitudinal Study

Data collected over the 15 years of the 9/11 study represents a massive amount of never before available information on the short and long-term impacts of a search & rescue deployment on the health and behavior of the search dog. Continue reading “Research Update CHF 02322 EY-4: Analysis of the Health, Behavioral, and Longevity Data Collected in the 9/11 Medical Surveillance Longitudinal Study”

Research Update CHF 02624 EY2: Embracing Polygenicity of Common Complex Disease in Dogs: Genome-wide Association of Cruciate Ligament Rupture

We have met our Labrador Retriever recruitment for this study over the past six months. We will continue to complete DNA isolation and marker genotyping of the remaining dogs needed for the study as long as the genotyping service remains open under the Covid-19 pandemic. Public engagement with the project continues to be good.

Over the next 6 months, we will focus on finalizing the marker data set for the study for which we do not yet have SNP genotypes. We will then undertake the computing needed to robustly estimate the heritability of cruciate ligament rupture in the Labrador Retriever and further advance prediction of risk of disease using the genomic marker data.

Our final data set is expected to include more than 1,000 Labrador Retriever dogs as promised under the award. We are extremely grateful for the outstanding engagement with this project by the community of Labrador Retriever owners and breeders that we work with.

End-Year-2 Research Update Dr. Muir for polygenicity of cruciate rupture.

Research Update CHF 02783 EY1: Transcriptional Profiling of Canine Soft Tissue Sarcoma

Soft tissue sarcoma (STS) encompasses a number of neoplasms that are derived from mesenchymal cells including fibrosarcoma, myxosarcoma, hemangiopericytoma, and undifferentiated sarcoma. In the dog, STSs arise frequently in the dermis/subcutis and represent up to 15% of the neoplasms in this location. Our primary aim of this grant was to collect cases of canine STS for histologic and gene expression analysis. Continue reading “Research Update CHF 02783 EY1: Transcriptional Profiling of Canine Soft Tissue Sarcoma”

Research Update CHF 02780 EY1: Bladder Carcinogen Exposures in Pet Dogs

Right after our AKC Canine Health Foundation grant funding started in March 2020, our lab was closed for 3 months due to COVD-19 and has since been limited to 50% occupancy. In addition, our teaching hospital has had limited appointments since March 2020.

We finished a few validation experiments on our DNA damage assays that were needed before recruitment, and we have started recruiting dogs with bladder cancer and matched controls. We enrolled our first two new cases and two controls this month. Continue reading “Research Update CHF 02780 EY1: Bladder Carcinogen Exposures in Pet Dogs”

Research Update CHF 02758 EY1: Optical Coherence Tomography for Margin Evaluation of Canine Skin and Subcutaneous Neoplasms

Thank you for supporting our project titled “Optical coherence tomography for margin evaluation of skin and subcutaneous neoplasms”. This project is investigating an emerging diagnostic imaging tool, optical coherence tomography that uses light waves to generate real time high-resolution images of tissues for detection of residual cancer cells immediately following surgical removal. Our team involves collaboration between veterinary medicine and pathology at the Ohio State University. We have had excellent progress in our patient enrollment, we completed enrollment of the 80 cases planned already! Continue reading “Research Update CHF 02758 EY1: Optical Coherence Tomography for Margin Evaluation of Canine Skin and Subcutaneous Neoplasms”

Research Update CHF 02502 EY3: Precision Medicine for Canine Lymphoma

We have successfully developed a canine cancer gene panel that we have called the Canine Oncopanel,  using cutting-edge, next-generation sequencing technology (NGS). The Canine Oncopanel allows sequencing of 283 cancer-related genes and detection of mutations within these genes that may drive the tumor cells to proliferate and survive. The canine oncopanel sequences a total target region that equates to ~3% of the canine genome. Analyzing the genomic composition of this broad target region allows evaluation of common genomic alterations that can lead to the development of cancer. The Canine Oncopanel is suitable to map mutation profiles and identify driver mechanisms in both common and rare canine cancers to provide a better understanding of the tumor genome and its biology.

Continue reading “Research Update CHF 02502 EY3: Precision Medicine for Canine Lymphoma”

Research Update CHF 02661 EY2: Investigation into Diet-Associated Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Dogs

The study titled “Investigation into Subclinical Diet- associated Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Four Dog Breeds” is progressing on schedule and nearing completion. Enrollment for the first part of the study is complete and a peer-reviewed manuscript describing the results has been published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (DOI: 10.1111/jvim.16075). The results of this part of the study showed higher levels for cardiac troponin I in dogs eating grain-free dog foods or foods that have peas, lentils or potatoes in the top 10 ingredients. Cardiac troponin I is a blood marker that indicates injury to the heart muscle. Even mild elevations can be important but future studies will be needed to determine with certainty that this is the case in these dogs. We did not find echocardiographic (heart ultrasound) differences between dogs eating grain-free and grain-inclusive foods. If the low-level elevation of cardiac troponin I truly indicates low-level heart muscle injury then it may be too early in these healthy dogs to manifest as echocardiographic differences.

Continue reading “Research Update CHF 02661 EY2: Investigation into Diet-Associated Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Dogs”

Research Update MAF D16CA-056 Final: Measuring Chemotherapy Drug Resistance in Dogs with T-cell Lymphoma

RESULTS: New Technology Helps Detect Small Amounts of Drug-Resistant Cancer Cells in Dogs with T-cell Lymphoma.

Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers from North Carolina State University used state-of-the-art DNA technology to help detect small amounts of drug-resistant cancer cells that persist after treatment in dogs with T-cell lymphoma (minimal residual disease, MRD). Accurately monitoring MRD could provide a fuller picture of the effectiveness of different drugs and improve treatment success, quality of life and survival for these patients. Continue reading “Research Update MAF D16CA-056 Final: Measuring Chemotherapy Drug Resistance in Dogs with T-cell Lymphoma”

Research Update CHF 02806-MOU MY1: Strategic Prevention of Canine Hemangiosarcoma: Lifetime Follow-Up

The goal for this project is to develop a reliable, accessible, and actionable test to identify dogs at risk for hemangiosarcoma during the earliest stages of disease and to use a strategic, rationally designed approach to prevent its occurrence in these high-risk dogs before it becomes clinically detrimental and life-threatening. The study has two objectives. The first is to determine the most reasonable duration of an SOS test result. In other words, how long can a low-risk SOS test result be trusted and how much time might elapse between a high-risk SOS test result and the development of hemangiosarcoma. The second aim is to continue periodic testing for dogs previously enrolled in the Shine On study whose test result would have placed them in a high-risk category for development of hemangiosarcoma, and to provide eBAT as a strategy for prevention in 12 of these dogs. Continue reading “Research Update CHF 02806-MOU MY1: Strategic Prevention of Canine Hemangiosarcoma: Lifetime Follow-Up”

Research Update CHF 02751-A EY1: Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Activation Induces Migration and Adhesion in Neoplastic Canine Lymphocytes

In the United States, spaying and neutering of dogs and cats is commonly performed to prevent the birth of unwanted pets. However, surgically removing the ovaries or testes may have unexpected consequences. Dogs that have been spayed or neutered have an increased risk for developing obesity, urinary incontinence, hypothyroidism, hyperadrenocorticism, diabetes, cruciate ligament tears, hip dysplasia, and cancer. Lymphoma is three to four times more common in spayed and neutered dogs compared to dogs left intact. In addition, dogs that are neutered before one year of age are three times more likely to develop lymphoma than dogs neutered after one year of age. This funded study is investigating the hormonal and cellular relationships between spaying/neutering and the development of lymphoma so that in the future new treatments will be available to extend life expectancies of dogs with cancer.

End-Year-1 Research Update Dr. Kutzler at early spay/neuter and neoplasia.